Learn how your EV charging station can help reducing CO2 emissions, local air pollution and provide you a small revenue stream.
Charging networks are not always there when you need them, they are often expensive and occupied. If you think back, it is kind of how hotels and motels were back in the days. They were often fully booked and expensive. Then came internet and AirBnB™ and today you can find a super place to spend the night anywhere for the right price.


So, what have this to do with EV’s you might think? The reason is quite clear – why should excess private capacity of EV chargers standby idle? The idle capacity is expensive to build, and it does not help the change to e-mobility. By providing the excess charging capacity to EVs that need charging, the charger can provide revenues, thus give return on investment. This also provides more stable baseload on the grid and less capacity is idle. In addition, reducing the cost per user of the grid.

This helps the uptake of EV’s that again reduces CO2 emissions and local air pollution. Here in Meshcrafts we found out that a kWh in an EV battery reduces about 600 g of CO2 emission, compared to petrol or diesel in an ICE car.

If you would like to help save the world one charger at the time, sign up for EVBnB and share your charger with the community.